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Wind Measurement from Dulas Reaches New Heights With WindCube Collaboration

Wind Measurement from Dulas Reaches New Heights With WindCube Collaboration

Dulas confirmed as Collaboration Partner for UK & Ireland

We are thrilled to announce to our valued clients today, that Dulas has been selected by Leosphere to be the exclusive collaboration partner for WindCube products and services in the UK and Ireland. After a lengthy period of discussion, Dulas are confirmed in the role, giving recognition to our responsive customer service record in the UK and our technical capabilities in the field.

Having worked with all the major LIDAR[1] suppliers in the UK for a number of years, the new collaboration is a complement to the existing product and services offering from Dulas which remains as strong as ever. At the same time, the collaboration allows Leosphere to provide a much stronger service capability to its existing customers, and builds on their presence in the UK as the world’s leading LIDAR supplier, a rare of example of a true win-win for everybody.

Leosphere’s WindCube is the global benchmark for vertical wind profiling. Capable of 12 measurements per second, and accurate across a range of heights up to 250m or more, WindCube is the world’s reference for reliable and consistent laser wind measurement.

This collaboration marks an important milestone in Dulas’s evolution and is also timely given that the trend for wind measurement is to seek wind speed data at ever taller heights. In response to changing market requirements, Dulas recently updated its guyed-monopole mast offering to 90m, with the capability to install lattice masts at even greater heights.

Rachel Munday, Commercial Lead for Dulas’s Wind Monitoring Department, writes that, “this is a really exciting period for Dulas and for our clients. With the removal of Government blocks now spurring the industry forwards, and the trend towards much larger turbines, we see a real demand for the superb technology on offer from WindCube. This, when combined with the bankability of traditional anemometry, means we have never been in a better position to measure so accurately, and at unprecedented heights.”

Since the company’s inception in 1982, Dulas’s motivation has always been to establish the benchmarks that define quality to our markets, to pioneer new technologies and to ensure that we recruit industry experts. On the back of this ethos, Dulas became one of the first companies in the world to understand and capture wind data, and we haven’t looked back since.

Our first data loggers were installed in Kenya and Mongolia in 1984, and by 1988, we’d installed 10 metre wind monitoring masts in Wales for what would become the second wind farm ever in the UK. Given our early adoption of the technology, it’s no wonder that as the decades progressed, we became the first choice for installing instruments on the world’s largest offshore windfarm at the time, The London Array, before gaining contracts for major international flagship projects across the world. We’ve never stopped innovating and developing, and that’s why all six of The Big Six trust us to provide them with reliable, bankable data in terrains as challenging as remote Scottish islands, the Norwegian fjords and out in the bitter North Sea.

We are truly delighted to be chosen by Leosphere to be their collaboration partner for the UK & Ireland, and this validates our approach to wind measurement, building on our previous successes. Leosphere’s portfolio of industry-best ground-based and wind-turbine-mounted lidar equipment are of the highest calibre, and they are known the world over for reliable wind measurement. Ranging from 50m to 3.5 km, these machines are unrivalled in their accuracy and endurance, and are used throughout renewables, climatology and aviation industries.

Leosphere products are a fantastic complement to our existing suite of products and services, including the rugged Chillwind Mast and other tilt-up mast options. We will continue to service all of our existing clients, whatever equipment they are using. Our offering remains unchanged in relation to lattice masts, power supplies, advanced logging, ongoing Operations and Maintenance support, and our wide range of monitoring capabilities.

All of our work is supported by Dulas’s dedicated and experienced Wind Monitoring Team. Based across our Head Office in in Wales and from two locations in Scotland, the team has decades of experience, and each member benefits from our commitment to up-to-date training, and health and safety management. Our dedicated in-house Health, Safety, Quality and Environment Manager ensures that the necessary standards are met on all Dulas projects, and we have also developed our own rigorous safety management systems that have been externally judged to be excellent.

This best-practice approach has been certified by stringent external bodies, and our list of accreditations currently includes ISO9001, ISO14001, UVDB/Achilles, IEMA, RoSPA and The Fair Tax Mark, proving that Quality, and Health and Safety are the paramount considerations in everything we do.

And of course, there’s good news for the industry generally. In March, the Government dramatically and unexpectedly lifted the blocks for onshore wind development by re-establishing the Contracts for Difference (CFD) for the onshore renewable projects. Since then, planning activity for onshore wind has increased significantly, and we know that by coupling the best products and services with these new projects, Britain could enter a new golden age of wind power.

Rachel Munday, Commercial Lead for Dulas’s Wind Monitoring Department, writes that,

‘We’ve been serving the wind monitoring needs of charities, businesses and communities for decades and feel optimistic that the next decade could be record-breaking for the UK. We look forward to working with Leosphere, and to further strengthening the value that we provide to our clients across the industry.’

[1] LIDAR is an acronym for; ‘Light Detection and Ranging’. It is a method of wind measurement that uses laser beam pulses to measure the wind speed in the atmosphere without the need for masts.